The Modern Practice Of Adult Education

| January 24, 2017

Learner Log Book (LLB) – Due Week 3: 31 January, 2017 – 15%
Purpose: The purpose of the Learner Log Book (LLB) is to have you record and reflect on your learning. Your LLB will be recorded in a BLOG. This activity will be done from Week 1 to Week 3. You will record your reflections in a blog every week, and your reflections will be: “Similarities and Differences in Instructional Design Processes in the Courses I am Taking in Spring Semester”
LLB Guide and points (out of 100 points)
1. Introduction -10 points
2. Week 1 Reflections – 15 points
3. Week 2 Reflections – 20 points
4. Week 3 Reflections – 25 points
5. Peer Review – 15 Points
6. Format (Language, logical flow, esthetical value and accessibility of blog) – 15 points
Format and Expectations
1. Since this is a blog, you may create your own format. For every week entry it should not exceed 2 pages of written work.
2. The expectation is that for every week you record a date you are writing the blog and raise key instructional design practices. What is it that attracted or distracted you in the courses you are taking? What was clear/unclear. Basically you are looking at teaching and learning practices and if these practices followed some important instructional design practices as per your understanding of ID.
Grading Rubric for LLB
Please refer to the rubric below for better clarity on the criteria that will be used to assess the LLB (BLOG)
Weight Average ( 1-2) Good ( 2.1-3.9) Excellent (4-5) Total
1.
Introduction
2
/10 The introduction gives a clear idea to the reader what your blog is all about. You may include an introduction about yourself. You may talk a little about instructional design. The courses you are taking etc.
2.
Week 1 Reflections
3
/15 You gave an account of the teaching and learning practices of the courses you are taking. You compared learning effectiveness. You used Instructional Design terminology to compare and contrast the courses.
3.
Week 2 Reflections
4
/20 You critically compared the instructional design strategies used by instructors. You gave suggestions on how improvements could be made etc.
4.
Week 3 Reflections
5
/25 You critically compared the instructional design strategies used by instructors. You gave suggestions on how improvements could be made etc.
5.
Peer Review
/15 You reviewed one of your peer’s blog and you included the review in the blog by giving constructive views on what your peer wrote
6.
Format
Your blog was free of errors, there was a logical flow of ideas and the blog format was professional
/15 Total /100 15% of 100 /15

 

 

 

 

Week 1

Delivery Mode: Face-to-Face Learning Synchronous Learning Self-paced Learning

 

Chapter

 

The Modern Practice Of Adult Education
Topics

 

The Modern Practice Of Adult Education

 

Link to learning outcome

 

CO1: Recognize understand and be capable to explain the concepts and theories related to andragogy and CSCL.
*Core reading materials

 

The Adult Learner: The definitive classic in adult education and human resource development
*T&L materials

 

-Dr. Khadeegha’s ppt uploaded onto week 1 of the vle.

-SME ppt uploaded onto week 1 of the vle.

 

*Recommended reading materials

 

·     Knowles, M., Holton E.L.III and Swanson R.A. “The Adult Learner” (7th Edition, 2011)

·     Gibbons, H.S. & Wentworth, G.P. (2001) Andrological and Pedagogical Training Differences for Online Instructors.

·     Koschmann, T. (2002) Dewey’s Contribution to the Foundations of CSCL Research, CSCL 2002 Proceedings, pp.17-23, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Hillsdale, New Jersey, USA

·     Edutech Wiki: 7.4 Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

·     ADCL ManagingCollaboration (w1)

·     Online pdf document uploaded for week 1 reading

 

*Activities

 

Ø  Contribute to the online glossary created on the vle.

Ø  Participate in the weekly discussion forum covering weekly topics covered

*Assessments

 

None this week

 

Week: 1
Delivery Mode:
Face-to-face
Synchronous
Self-paced
Main Topic
Introduction to the Instructional Design Process Sub topics
1. Introduction to the Course
2. Why Instructional Design?
3. What is Instructional Design?
Topic Alignment with Course Outcomes
LO1 : Demonstrate critical understanding of the key instructional design concepts Weekly Learning Outcomes
At the end of the session, learners will:
1. Demonstrate understanding of course expectations
2. Differentiate benefits of instructional design for businesses and K-12
3. Explain what is instructional design
4. Compare and contrast instructional design practices as applied in different fields, for example, business and government, medical, military and education.
5. Explain the 7 premises underlying the instructional design process
Teaching and Learning Resources Main
Chapter 1: Introduction to the ID Process. Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
Supplementary
1. A History of Instructional Systems Design
http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/history_isd/isdhistory.html
2. Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching as a Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for Learning and Technology (1st ed.). Routledge, NY: Routledge. Chapter 1: Teaching as a design science
Activities
1. The session will start with getting to know each other.
2. The syllabus as well as the text book will be discussed.
3. An overview of instructional design will be given.
4. Activities related to the learning outcomes will be carried out to ensure learners are actively involved in constructing their knowledge related to what, why and premises of instructional design.
Assessment
1. Exit ticket on what is instructional design?

 

Learner Log Book (LLB) – Due Week 3: 31 January, 2017 – 15%
Purpose: The purpose of the Learner Log Book (LLB) is to have you record and reflect on your learning. Your LLB will be recorded in a BLOG. This activity will be done from Week 1 to Week 3. You will record your reflections in a blog every week, and your reflections will be: “Similarities and Differences in Instructional Design Processes in the Courses I am Taking in Spring Semester”
LLB Guide and points (out of 100 points)
1. Introduction -10 points
2. Week 1 Reflections – 15 points
3. Week 2 Reflections – 20 points
4. Week 3 Reflections – 25 points
5. Peer Review – 15 Points
6. Format (Language, logical flow, esthetical value and accessibility of blog) – 15 points
Format and Expectations
1. Since this is a blog, you may create your own format. For every week entry it should not exceed 2 pages of written work.
2. The expectation is that for every week you record a date you are writing the blog and raise key instructional design practices. What is it that attracted or distracted you in the courses you are taking? What was clear/unclear. Basically you are looking at teaching and learning practices and if these practices followed some important instructional design practices as per your understanding of ID.
Grading Rubric for LLB
Please refer to the rubric below for better clarity on the criteria that will be used to assess the LLB (BLOG)
Weight Average ( 1-2) Good ( 2.1-3.9) Excellent (4-5) Total
1.
Introduction
2
/10 The introduction gives a clear idea to the reader what your blog is all about. You may include an introduction about yourself. You may talk a little about instructional design. The courses you are taking etc.
2.
Week 1 Reflections
3
/15 You gave an account of the teaching and learning practices of the courses you are taking. You compared learning effectiveness. You used Instructional Design terminology to compare and contrast the courses.
3.
Week 2 Reflections
4
/20 You critically compared the instructional design strategies used by instructors. You gave suggestions on how improvements could be made etc.
4.
Week 3 Reflections
5
/25 You critically compared the instructional design strategies used by instructors. You gave suggestions on how improvements could be made etc.
5.
Peer Review
/15 You reviewed one of your peer’s blog and you included the review in the blog by giving constructive views on what your peer wrote
6.
Format
Your blog was free of errors, there was a logical flow of ideas and the blog format was professional
/15 Total /100 15% of 100 /15

 

 

 

11/01/2016
Course Syllabus
No of Credit Hours:
Pre-requisite(s):
CISD601
Postgraduate
Adult Development & Collaborative Learning
3
N/A
Version:
Approval Date:
2
Effective as of: –
CISD601-Adult Development & Collaborative Learning
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Section 1: General Information
1.1
The course on ‘Adult Development & Collaborative Learning’ addresses a specific audience of mature
learners. It emphasizes the orientation of the program towards the emerging adult education based on an original
theory of andragogy (the art and science of helping adults learn) as distinguished from pedagogy (teaching children
and youth). In the context of e-Education, Adult Development & Collaborative Learning tackles specific issues
such as knowledge-building, building learning communities, or creating motivation. e-Andragogy refers not only to
strategies or styles of instruction, but also to the facilitation and management of sustainable transformations be it
individual, social, structural or institutional, in order to answer the increasing heterogeneity of globalised societies.
After a general introduction to some principles of andragogy, the course will show how technology has transformed
adult learning by promoting computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Meaning and the practices of
meaning-making in the context of joint activity is the object of CSCL, along with the ways in which these practices
are mediated through designed artifacts (Koschmann, 2002). The process and practices of meaning-making
focuses on the social practices of joint meaning-making, rather than individuals’ practices in social settings. Stahl
(2002a) include the study of ‘the ways in which these [meaning-making] practices are mediated through designed
artifacts.’ Building on CSCL as a foundation principle, the course investigates the concepts of learning
communities, communities of practice and communities of networked expertise.
1.2 COURSE GOALS
G1 Building on a deep understanding of the underlying principles of CSCL, the course intends to give the learners a
practical, hands-on experience of collaborative learning in the context of adult develo
G2 To prepare learners to apply CSCL and launch a community of practice (CoP) in the context of a project.
G3 To prepare learners to cultivate CoPs in an organization and to understand the concepts of organizational learning.
G4 To prepare learners to build on CoPs for promoting sustainable organizational learning and thus creating value for
the organization.
COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this course, learners will be able to:
1.3
O1 CO1 Recognize understand and be capable to explain the concepts and theories related to andragogy and
CSCL.
O2 CO2 Analyze the most important psychological impacts of CSCL in the individual, social and organizational
learning process.
O3 CO3 Analyze the connection between online collaborative learning and psychological factors, including learning
styles, personality types and cognitive controls
O4 CO4 Gain a practical hands-on experience of collaboration in the context of communities of practice.
O5 CO5 Measure the impact of collaborative learning and communities of practice on organizational learning and value
creation in an organization.
1.4 ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS
Regular attendance and punctuality is required for all classes whether conducted online or physical in accordance with the
Attendance Policy outlined in the Learner Handbook.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 2 of 7 Version 2
CISD601-Adult Development & Collaborative Learning
1.5 REQUIRED TEXT
Author Title Year – Edition Publisher ISBN
Knowles, M., Holton
E.L.III and Swanson
R.A.
The Adult Learner: The
definitive classic in adult
education and human
resource development
2011 Butterworth-
Heinemann
13-978-185617
8112
1.6 DELIVERY STRATEGY
The delivery strategy is generally based on the blended learning approach. Blended learning combines the benefits of
traditional learning; self-paced learning and online collaboration. Self-paced Learning is supported by carefully designed study
books, pre-recorded master classes, textbooks and web-based courses. Online collaboration fosters interaction between faculty
members and learners through the use of online communication tools in a synchronous mode and represents the majority of the
interaction and occurs usually through pre-scheduled virtual classes. The asynchronous communication relies on the use of
tools such as emails and discussion forum. The traditional face-to-face learning refers to tutorial support through physical
sessions. The detailed delivery strategy of this course is available in the study plan of this syllabus.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 3 of 7 Version 2
CISD601-Adult Development & Collaborative Learning
Section 2: Assessment Strategy
Assessment
No.
Assessment
Type
Week Weighting % Link to Learning Outcome
1 Assignment 7 15 O3,O4
2 Individual Project 13 30 O1,O2,O3,O5
3 Participation 15 15 O3,O4
4 Exams 16 40 O1,O2,O3,O4,O5
Total 100
2.1 GRADE AWARDED
Percentage Scores Letter Grade Points
90 – 100 A 4.00
84 – 89 B+ 3.50
80 – 84 B 3.00
74 – 79 C+ 2.50
70 – 74 C 2.00
0 – 69 F 0.00
2.2 PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism is a serious offense that can lead to expulsion from the university. Learners must be familiar with the Plagiarism
policy which outlines the procedure that will be followed in case of plagiarism. (Plagiarism is outlined in the “Academic Honesty
Policy”).
2.3 LATE ASSIGNMENT PENALTIES
Please refer to the “Incomplete Coursework Policy” and “Coursework Assessment Policy” in the learners’ handbook.
2.4 SPECIAL CONSIDERATION (ONGOING ASSESSMENT)
Delay in submitting an ongoing assessment without previous approval from the course faculty may result in a zero mark for
that specific assessment component. However, if the reason for not submitting that assessment component is a valid one in
the judgement of the faculty concerned, the learner may be given another opportunity to submit that coursework component.
(Special consideration cases are subject to Coursework Assessment Policy).
2.5 SPECIAL CONSIDERATION (END-OF-COURSE ASSESSMENT)
Learners seeking special consideration for the end-of-course assessment must apply in writing to the Program Director no
later than 5 working days from the date of the End-of-Course Assessment. Evidence must also be supplied to support the
application. Subject to the evidence provided, the Dean of school will make a decision to either approve or reject the
application. (Special Consideration cases are subject to Incomplete Coursework Policy)
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 4 of 7 Version 2
CISD601-Adult Development & Collaborative Learning
2.6 QUALITY ASSURANCE
Learners should note that photocopies of random (marked) assessment tasks will be made for internal and external quality
assurance purposes.
2.7 RELEVANT POLICIES AND DOCUMENTS
Other relevant academic policies are available on the learners’ handbook and the university website.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 5 of 7 Version 2
CISD601-Adult Development & Collaborative Learning
Section 3: Course Weekly Plan
Week No Chapter Core reading material
1 The Modern Practice Of Adult Education Knowles, M., Holton E.L.III and Swanson R.A.
â€oeThe Adult Learnerâ€?
2 Foundations of CSCL Knowles, M., Holton E.L.III and Swanson R.A.
â€oeThe Adult Learnerâ€?
3 Activity Theory and Group Work
organisation
Transforming learning and knowledge creation on
the shop floor
4 CSCL in practice [Conception and
implementation of rich pedagogical
scenarios through collaborative portal sites]
Knowles, M., Holton E.L.III and Swanson R.A.
â€oeThe Adult Learnerâ€? (6th Edition, 2005) •
Schneider, D.K., Paraskevi, S. (2005) Conception
and implementation of rich pedagogical scenarios
through collaborative portal sites, in Senteni & A.
Taurisson, A. – Innovative Learning & Knowledge
Communities – University of Mauritius (under the
auspices of the UNESCO), pp. 243-268.
ISBN-99903-73-19-1.
5 The value of communities of practice(1) Communities of Practice -Their value to
organisations, their structural elements
6 Implementing Communities of practice(2) Communities of Practice – Seven Principles
7 Cultivating Communities of Practice (3) Cultivating Communities of Practice – Early Stages
8 The Challenge of Distributed Communities Cultivating Communities of Practice-The challenge
of Distributed Communities
9 Measuring & Managing Value Creation Communities of Practice – Measuring & Managing
Value Creation
10 Communities beyond Organizations Cultivating Communities of Practice –
Community-Based Knowledge Initiatives
11 Communities in Practice Cultivating Communities of Practice
Community-Based Knowledge Initiatives
12 Communities in Practice Community-Based Knowledge Initiatives
13 Communities in Practice Cultivating Communities of Practice
14 Communities in Practice Cultivating Communities of Practice
15 Exam Revision Cover all above topics
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 6 of 7 Version 2
CISD601-Adult Development & Collaborative Learning
*Fulltime Faculty members and associates are expected to complete the 45 contact hours (teaching and learning hours) within 15
weeks. The end of course submissions, presentations, examinations and other types of final assessment will be scheduled during
the final assessment period. Please refer to the detailed schedule of the course and final assessment published in the course
schedule.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 7 of 7 Version 2\

 

 

 

11/01/2016
Course Syllabus
No of Credit Hours:
Pre-requisite(s):
CISD600
Postgraduate
Learning Theories for Online Education
3
N/A
Version:
Approval Date:
5
Effective as of: –
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Section 1: General Information
1.1
Learning Theories for Online Education is a survey course presenting an overview of learning and instructional
theories designed to provide learners, educators, administrators, and leaders with a better understanding of what
works best when, how, and why, in the teaching-learning process. This objective of this course is to engage
learners, through study, dialogue, and discourse, to understanding of how people learn and what variables
influence and impact that learning. The course focuses on four main learning paradigms: (1) behavioral, which
focuses on observable changes in behavior; (2) cognitive, which focuses on thought processes underlying
behavior; (3) social, which focuses on learning through social observation; and (4) constructivist which is based on
the idea that knowledge is constructed through the interplay of existing knowledge and social experience. The
course investigates the evolution of the concept of learning in a knowledge society, addressing epistemological
issues about how learning occurs and how knowledge emerges beyond the borders of traditional systems of
education. It proposes a unified view of learning, teaching, and technology, so as to open a creative space where
learning, innovation and work can be integrated, looking into issues of computer-mediated learning (how people
learn, using educational technologies as mediating tools). Taking an historical perspective on Open &
Distance Learning (ODL), computer-mediated communication and online learning, the course shows how learning
theories have influenced the development of the several generations of educational technologies, from drill &
practice, to AI educational tools, and the most recent online distributed learning environments.
1.2 COURSE GOALS
G1 Expose learners – as future instructors and leaders – to concepts and theories related to learning mediated by
educational technologies and to prepare them to apply these concepts to the evaluation, development, and,
assessment of learning.
G2 Prepare learners to develop, enhance/add-value to methodologies for planning, managing, developing and
assessing educational scenarios and activities enhanced by technology, online particularly.
G3 Develop sound theoretical foundations allowing learners to understand, evaluate or improve learning scenarios,
and to promote alternative goals and strategies when necessary.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 2 of 10 Version 5
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this course, learners will be able to:
1.3
O1 Recognize the various theories of online learning and be able to critically discriminate and use them in designing
learning scenarios.
O2 Evaluate and critically incorporate principles of learning in the development of lessons intended for online use.
O3 Comprehend the user needs and select appropriate learning scenarios for online learning, targeting different
audiences in different contexts.
O4 Analyze and assess online courses according to learning contexts, learning styles, course types, learning
resources and technologies available.
O5 Demonstrate sufficient knowledge of the transformative learning process to propose innovative strategies using
ICT integration to improve all kinds of learning situations.
O6 Critically evaluate, select, and implement the most suitable learning strategies for a given context, according to
learners profiles and type of knowledge to be learnt, contextualized or created
O7 KNOWLEDGE [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: K1 – Learners will acquire a comprehensive and highly
specialized knowledge of learning theories from a descriptive perspective (how people learn). K2 – Learners will
master the processes of enquiry and knowledge production in learning theories, allowing them to investigate the
evolution of the concept of learning in a knowledge society beyond the borders of traditional systems of education.
O8 SKILLS [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: S1 – Learners will be able to demonstrate advanced skills
required by research, analysis, evaluation and/or innovation about learning in a knowledge society, beyond the
borders of traditional systems of education. S2 – Learners will be able to able to develop new knowledge and
procedures, allowing them to allowing them to investigate the evolution of the concept of learning in a knowledge
society. S3 – Learners will be able to demonstrate specialized communication and information technology skills to
present, explain and/or critique complex issues related to learning in a knowledge society.
O9 AUTONOMY RESPONSIBILITY [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: AR1 – Learners can analyze and
reflect on sociocultural norms and relationships related to learning in a knowledge society
O10 ROLE IN CONTEXT [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: RIC1 – Learners can initiate and manage
collaborative activities in highly complex technology-enhanced educational environments.
O11 SELF DEVELOPMENT [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: SD1 – Learners can self-evaluate and take
responsibility for contributing to professional knowledge and practice based on sharing and collaboration in
technology-enhanced learning environments.
1.4 ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS
Regular attendance and punctuality is required for all classes whether conducted online or physical in accordance with the
Attendance Policy outlined in the Learner Handbook.
1.5 REQUIRED TEXT
Author Title Year – Edition Publisher ISBN
Driscoll, M. P. Learning Theory and Online
Psychology of Learning for
Instruction
2005 Allyn &
Bacon
0-205-37519-7
1.6 DELIVERY STRATEGY
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 3 of 10 Version 5
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
The delivery strategy is generally based on the blended learning approach. Blended learning combines the benefits of
traditional learning; self-paced learning and online collaboration. Self-paced Learning is supported by carefully designed study
books, pre-recorded master classes, textbooks and web-based courses. Online collaboration fosters interaction between faculty
members and learners through the use of online communication tools in a synchronous mode and represents the majority of the
interaction and occurs usually through pre-scheduled virtual classes. The asynchronous communication relies on the use of
tools such as emails and discussion forum. The traditional face-to-face learning refers to tutorial support through physical
sessions. The detailed delivery strategy of this course is available in the study plan of this syllabus.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 4 of 10 Version 5
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
Section 2: Assessment Strategy
Assessment
No.
Assessment
Type
Week Weighting % Link to Learning Outcome
1 LLB 5 15 O2,O4
2 Group Project 10 20 O3,O5
3 Individual Project 14 15 O1,O2,O3,O4,O5,O6
4 Participation 14 10 O1,O2,O3,O4,O5,O6
5 Final Exam 16 40 O1,O2,O3,O4,O5,O6
Total 100
2.1 GRADE AWARDED
Percentage Scores Letter Grade Points
90 – 100 A 4.00
84 – 89 B+ 3.50
80 – 84 B 3.00
74 – 79 C+ 2.50
70 – 74 C 2.00
0 – 69 F 0.00
2.2 PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism is a serious offense that can lead to expulsion from the university. Learners must be familiar with the Plagiarism
policy which outlines the procedure that will be followed in case of plagiarism. (Plagiarism is outlined in the “Academic Honesty
Policy”).
2.3 LATE ASSIGNMENT PENALTIES
Please refer to the “Incomplete Coursework Policy” and “Coursework Assessment Policy” in the learners’ handbook.
2.4 SPECIAL CONSIDERATION (ONGOING ASSESSMENT)
Delay in submitting an ongoing assessment without previous approval from the course faculty may result in a zero mark for
that specific assessment component. However, if the reason for not submitting that assessment component is a valid one in
the judgement of the faculty concerned, the learner may be given another opportunity to submit that coursework component.
(Special consideration cases are subject to Coursework Assessment Policy).
2.5 SPECIAL CONSIDERATION (END-OF-COURSE ASSESSMENT)
Learners seeking special consideration for the end-of-course assessment must apply in writing to the Program Director no
later than 5 working days from the date of the End-of-Course Assessment. Evidence must also be supplied to support the
application. Subject to the evidence provided, the Dean of school will make a decision to either approve or reject the
application. (Special Consideration cases are subject to Incomplete Coursework Policy)
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 5 of 10 Version 5
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
2.6 QUALITY ASSURANCE
Learners should note that photocopies of random (marked) assessment tasks will be made for internal and external quality
assurance purposes.
2.7 RELEVANT POLICIES AND DOCUMENTS
Other relevant academic policies are available on the learners’ handbook and the university website.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 6 of 10 Version 5
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
Section 3: Course Weekly Plan
Week No Chapter Core reading material
1 Introduction and Course Overview
Overview of history and major schools of
thought – Why study learning? – Laboratory
models to field – models of learning – Nature
versus Nurture – Objective versus
subjective reality – Learning theory in the
knowledge age
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 1: Introduction to Theories
of Learning and Instruction. Available online at:
http://ocw.metu.edu.tr/file.php/118/Dris_2005.pdf
2 Learning Theory and Research –
Systematic approach to understanding –
Conducting a literature review – Identifying
variables that impact learning – Academic
integrity – Citations and referencing
Reeves, T. C., McKenney, S., & Herrington, J.
(2010). Publishing and perishing: The critical
importance of educational design research. In C.H.
Steel, M.J. Keppell, P. Gerbic & S. Housego
(Eds.),Curriculum, technology & transformation for
an unknown future. Proceedings ascilite Sydney
2010 (pp. 787-794).
http://ascilite.org.au/conferences/sydney10/procs/
Reeves-full.pdf
3 Behaviorism – Connectionism – Thorndike –
Law of effect Classical conditioning –
Pavlov / Watson – Emotional conditioning
Forming and changing habits Operant
conditioning – Skinner – Schedules of
reinforcement – Shaping / Behaviour
modification – Programmed instruction
Applying theory to principles of teaching
and learning in an online / blended
environment
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 2: Radical Behaviorism
(pp. 29-68). McDonald, J. K., Yanchar, S. C., &
Osguthorpe, R. T. (2005). Learning from
programmed instruction: Examining implications
for modern instructional technology. Educational
Technology Research & Development, 53(2),
84-98.
4 Cognitive Information Processing • The
information processing system • How
memory works – Sensory input – working
memory – long-term memory • Alternative
conceptions of cognition • Cognitivist and
online learning design – Cognitive theory of
multimedia learning – Cognitive load
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 3: Cognitive Information
Processing (pp. 71-110). Hannafin, M., Hannafin,
K., & Grabbitas, B. (2009). Reexamining cognition
during student
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 7 of 10 Version 5
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
5 Meaningful Learning & Schema Theory –
Gestalt theories of learning –
Phenomenology – How people perceive the
world, Meaningful reception learning
(Ausubel) – Knowledge acquisition and
retention – Advance organizers – Cognitive
organization, Schemas – role in learning,
Cognitive load – Cognition and online
learning design – Multimedia learning,
Developing instruction for online useA1 –
Annotated Bibliography due (20%)
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 4: Meaningful Learning
and Schema Theory (pp. 111-152). Zhang, L.,
Ayres, P., & Chan, K. (2011). Examining different
types of collaborative learning in a complex
computer-based environment: A cognitive load
approach. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(1),
94-98. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2010.03.038
6 Situated Cognition – Authentic activity –
Collaboration – Project-based learning –
Anchored instruction – Problem-based
learning – Social cognitive approaches to
learning – Cognitive apprenticeship –
Communities of practice
The Knowledge Creation Metaphor: Emergent
Epistemological Approach to Learning
6 Situated Cognition – Authentic activity –
Collaboration – Project-based learning –
Anchored instruction – Problem-based
learning – Social cognitive approaches to
learning – Cognitive apprenticeship –
Communities of practice
The Knowledge Creation Metaphor: Emergent
Epistemological Approach to Learning
7 Developmental Theories of Learning –
Cognitive development theories –
Components of cognitive development –
Piaget’s genetic epistemology –
Neo-Piagetian views – Exposure to media
and cognitive development – Impact of
media engagement on the cognition of the
developing child P1 – Participation Grade 1
(5%)
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 6: Cognitive and
Knowledge Development (pp. 185-222). Case, R.
(1993). Theories of learning and theories of
development. Educational Psychologist, 28,
219-233. Roberts, D. F., & Foehr, U. G. (2008).
Trends in media use. The Future of Children, 18(1),
11-37.
8 Interactional Theories of Cognitive
Development – Theories of cognitive growth
(Bruner) – Knowledge representation –
Spiral curriculum – Reciprocal interactions
(Bandura) – Enactive and vicarious learning
– Cognitive modeling – Worked examples –
Tutoring and mentoring – Vygotsky: The
social formation of the mind – Zone of
proximal development
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 7: Interactional theories of
cognitive development (pp. 223-264). Alfieri, L.,
Brooks, P. J., Aldrich, N. J., & Tenenbaum, H. R.
(2011). Does discovery-based instruction enhance
learning? Journal of Educational Psychology,
103(1), 1-18. doi: 10.1037/a0021017 Gredler, M.
(2012). Understanding Vygotsky for the classroom:
Is it too late? Educational Psychology Review,
24(1), 113-131. DOI: 10.1007/s10648-011-9183-6
9 Biological Bases of Learning and Behaviour
– Learning, memory, and the brain – Neural
networks – Cognitive development and the
brain – Critical periods – Plasticity –
Computer support for brain-based learning
Learning domains, levels and style
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 8 of 10 Version 5
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
9 Biological Bases of Learning and Behaviour
– Learning, memory, and the brain – Neural
networks – Cognitive development and the
brain – Critical periods – Plasticity –
Computer support for brain-based learning
Learning domains, levels and style
10 Motivation and Self-Regulation in Learning –
Origins and determinants of motivation –
Pawns and origins – Learner control –
Intrinsic motivation – Perceived
competence – Achievement motivation –
Self-regulated learning – Learning to learn –
ARCS model of motivational design A2 –
Collaborative Project (20%)
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 9: Motivation and
Self-Regulation in Learning (pp. 307-348).
Pintrich, R. R., & DeGroot, E. V. (1990).
Motivational and self-regulated learning
components of classroom academic performance.
Journal of Educational Psychology, 82, 33-40.
Tony Robbins: Why we do what we do [Video]
http://www.ted.com/talks/tony_robbins_asks_why_
we_do_what_we_do.html
11 Gagne’s Theory of Instruction – Principles
of learning – Complexity of human learning –
The learning framework – Internal and
external conditions of learning – Principles
of instruction – Designing performance
objectives – The role of media – ARCS
model of motivational design – The ADDIE
model
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 10: Gagne’s Theory of
Instruction (pp. 349-383). Peterson, C. (2003).
Bringing ADDIE to Life: Instructional design at its
best. Journal of Educational Multimedia &
Hypermedia, 12(3), 227-241.
12 Constructivism – The context of
constructivism – The nature of knowledge –
Assumptions and perspectives – The major
thinkers – Piaget – Cognitive development –
Vygotsky – Sociocultural theory –
Constructivist learning – pedagogy –
Socially mediated learning – Scaffolding –
Inquiry teaching – Peer-assisted learning
-Constructivist learning technology
-Constructivist learning environments
Driscoll (2005) – Chapter 11: Constructivism (pp.
384-410). Brooks, M. G., & Brooks, J. G. (1999).
The courage to be constructivist. Educational
Leadership, 57(3). Retrieved from ASCD website:
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leade
rship/nov99/vol57/num03/The-Courage-to-Be-Con
structivist.aspx Karagiorgi, Y., & Symeou, L.
(2005). Translating constructivism into instructional
design: Potential and limitations. Educational
Technology & Society, 8(1), 17-27.
13 Learner-Centered Principles – The basics of
learner-centered ideas (APA-LCP) – The
instructor’s role – The learner’s role – The
administrator’s role – Implementing a
learner-centered approach – Structuring
learning – The evaluation process – Online
learner-centered learning environments –
Principles of design -Evaluation: What
works and what doesn’t?
American Psychological Association (1997).
Learner-Centered Psychology Principles: A
Framework for School Redesign and Reform.
http://www.apa.org/ed/lcp.html Bonk, C. J., &
Cunningham, D. J. (1998). Chapter 2: Searching
for learner-centered constructivist, and
sociocultural components of collaborative
educational learning tools. In C. J. Bonk, D. J.
Cunningham & K. S. King (Eds.), Electronic
collaborators: Learner-centered technologies for
literacy, apprenticeship, and discourse (pp. 25–50).
Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Weimer, M. (2012). Five
characteristics of learner-centered teaching.
Faculty Focus.
http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teac
hing-strategies/five-characteristics-of-learner-cente
red-teaching/
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 9 of 10 Version 5
CISD600-Learning Theories for Online Education
14 Online and Blended Learning – Online
Collaborative Learning (OCL) – The role of
the instructor – The role of the learner –
Moderating learner-centered e-learning –
Learning to learn in an online collaborative
group – Benefits and challenges – Analyzing
and evaluating online communicationA3 –
Personal Theory of Learning Paper (20%)
P1 – Participation Grade 2 (5%)
Moore, J. L., Dickson-Deane, C., & Gaylen, K.
(2011). e-Learning, online learning, and distance
learning environments: Are they the same? Internet
and Higher Education, 14, 129-135. doi:
10.1016/j.iheduc.2010.10.001 Available online at
http://www.researchgate.net/publication/233779932
_eLearning_online_learning_and_distance_learning
_environments_Are_they_the_same/file/72e7e529
5097532bac.pdf
15 Review & Discussion – Putting it all together
– Open discussion A4 – Final Assessment
(20%) – Exam Period P2 – Participation
Grade 2 (5%)
Review
*Fulltime Faculty members and associates are expected to complete the 45 contact hours (teaching and learning hours) within 15
weeks. The end of course submissions, presentations, examinations and other types of final assessment will be scheduled during
the final assessment period. Please refer to the detailed schedule of the course and final assessment published in the course
schedule.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 10 of 10 Version 5

 

 

 

 

20/12/2016
Course Syllabus
No of Credit Hours:
Pre-requisite(s):
CISD610
Postgraduate
Principles of Instructional Design
3
N/A
Version:
Approval Date:
7
Effective as of: Fall 2015
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Section 1: General Information
1.1
This course covers the fundamentals of instructional design, including the principles of learning theory and
instructional design models, with an emphasis on the recent contributions from cognitive psychology and the
related fields. The course walks learners into the different phases of the instructional design process with a special
focus on the “analysis” phase (conducting a detailed Front End Analysis (FEA)) and on the “design” and
“development” phases. Learners will be equipped with the knowledge and skills sets needed to design and
develop education and training materials spanning a wide range of knowledge domains and instructional
technologies. Additionally, the course focuses on instructional design from a project management perspective
highlighting the full life-span of the project and what it takes to effectively manage any instructional design project
regardless of its scope and scale.
1.2 COURSE GOALS
G1 Facilitate learners’ understanding of the principles and theoretical foundations of instructional design.
G2 Equip learners with the knowledge and skill sets needed to systematically apply proven principles of instructional
design in practice. spanning a wide range of knowledge domains and instructional technologies.
G3 Equip learners with the knowledge and skill sets needed to ensure effective management of instructional design
projects.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 2 of 10 Version 7
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this course, learners will be able to:
1.3
O 1 Demonstrate critical understanding of the key instructional design concepts
O 2 Get acquainted with the resources and tools available to them to utilize in instructional design projects.
O 3 Apply instructional design models and techniques in the design and development of (online) courses.
O 4 Conduct several detailed Front End Analyses (FEA) as prerequisites of any instructional design project.
O 5 Address learners’/ trainees’ cultural difference in the design of (online) course materials.
O 6 Apply the principles of the ARCS motivation model to engage learners/ trainees.
O 7 Implement pedagogical design patterns for the structuring of the content.
O 8 Apply principles of multimedia design resulting from cognitive load theory.
O 9 Consider important measures to ensure the quality of courses: standardization, project management and
evaluation
O 10 KNOWLEDGE [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: Demonstrate critical understanding of the key
instructional design concepts. Demonstrate knowledge needed to systematically apply proven principles of
instructional design in a systematic manner spanning a wide range of knowledge domains and instructional
technologies. Demonstrate knowledge needed to ensure effective management of instructional design projects.
O 11 SKILLS [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: S1- Apply instructional design models and techniques in the
design and development of (online) courses.S2- Conduct several detailed Front End Analyses (FEA)) analyses as
prerequisites of any instructional design project: needs S3- and problem analysis, learner analysis, knowledge and
task analyses, contextual and cost analyses. Apply instructional design models and techniques in the design and
development of (online) courses. S4- Consider important measures to ensure the quality of courses:
standardization, project management and evaluation.
O 12 AUTONOMY RESPONSIBILITY [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: AR1- Get acquainted with the
resources and tools available to them to utilize in instructional design projects.AR2- Address learners’/ trainees’
cultural difference in the design of (online) course materials. AR3- Apply the principles of the ARCS motivation
model to engage learners/ trainees. AR4- Implement pedagogical design patterns for the structuring of the content.
AR5- Apply principles of multimedia design resulting from cognitive load theory.
O 13 ROLE IN CONTEXT [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: RIC 1- Conduct several detailed Front End
Analyses (FEA)) analyses as prerequisites of any instructional design project: needs and problem analysis, learner
analysis, knowledge and task analyses, contextual and cost analyses.RIC 2- Consider important measures to
ensure the quality of courses: standardization, project management and evaluation RIC 3- Apply instructional
design models and techniques in the design and development of (online) courses.
O 14 SELF-DEVELOPMENT [Reviewed according to QFE Standards]: SD1-learners take responsibility for their own
future learning needs in new situations. SD2- Learners gain from their own and others experiences in different
contexts and assimilate new knowledge and skills in their practice in instructional design.
1.4 ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS
Regular attendance and punctuality is required for all classes whether conducted online or physical in accordance with the
Attendance Policy outlined in the Learner Handbook.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 3 of 10 Version 7
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
1.5 REQUIRED TEXT
Author Title Year – Edition Publisher ISBN
Gary R. Morrison,
Steven M. Ross,
Jerrold E. Kemp &
Howard K. Kalman
Designing Effective Instruction 2010 John Wiley &
Sons
978-04705228
2
Diana Laurillard Teaching as a Design
Science: Building Pedagogical
Patterns for Learning and
Technology
2012 ROUTLEDG
E
ISBN-13:
978-04158038
78
1.6 DELIVERY STRATEGY
The delivery strategy is generally based on the blended learning approach. Blended learning combines the benefits of
traditional learning; self-paced learning and online collaboration. Self-paced Learning is supported by carefully designed study
books, pre-recorded master classes, textbooks and web-based courses. Online collaboration fosters interaction between faculty
members and learners through the use of online communication tools in a synchronous mode and represents the majority of the
interaction and occurs usually through pre-scheduled virtual classes. The asynchronous communication relies on the use of
tools such as emails and discussion forum. The traditional face-to-face learning refers to tutorial support through physical
sessions. The detailed delivery strategy of this course is available in the study plan of this syllabus.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 4 of 10 Version 7
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
Section 2: Assessment Strategy
Assessment
No.
Assessment
Type
Week Weighting % Link to Learning Outcome
1 LLB 3 15
2 Assignment 7 15
3 Assignment 11 15
4 Participation 15 15
5 Individual Project 16 40
Total 100
2.1 GRADE AWARDED
Percentage Scores Letter Grade Points
90 – 100 A 4.00
84 – 89 B+ 3.50
80 – 84 B 3.00
74 – 79 C+ 2.50
70 – 74 C 2.00
0 – 69 F 0.00
2.2 PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism is a serious offense that can lead to expulsion from the university. Learners must be familiar with the Plagiarism
policy which outlines the procedure that will be followed in case of plagiarism. (Plagiarism is outlined in the “Academic Honesty
Policy”).
2.3 LATE ASSIGNMENT PENALTIES
Please refer to the “Incomplete Coursework Policy” and “Coursework Assessment Policy” in the learners’ handbook.
2.4 SPECIAL CONSIDERATION (ONGOING ASSESSMENT)
Delay in submitting an ongoing assessment without previous approval from the course faculty may result in a zero mark for
that specific assessment component. However, if the reason for not submitting that assessment component is a valid one in
the judgement of the faculty concerned, the learner may be given another opportunity to submit that coursework component.
(Special consideration cases are subject to Coursework Assessment Policy).
2.5 SPECIAL CONSIDERATION (END-OF-COURSE ASSESSMENT)
Learners seeking special consideration for the end-of-course assessment must apply in writing to the Program Director no
later than 5 working days from the date of the End-of-Course Assessment. Evidence must also be supplied to support the
application. Subject to the evidence provided, the Dean of school will make a decision to either approve or reject the
application. (Special Consideration cases are subject to Incomplete Coursework Policy)
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 5 of 10 Version 7
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
2.6 QUALITY ASSURANCE
Learners should note that photocopies of random (marked) assessment tasks will be made for internal and external quality
assurance purposes.
2.7 RELEVANT POLICIES AND DOCUMENTS
Other relevant academic policies are available on the learners’ handbook and the university website.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 6 of 10 Version 7
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
Section 3: Course Weekly Plan
Week No Chapter Core reading material
1 • Defining Instructional Design • The
Evolvement of Instructional Design
Theories • An Overview of the
Instructional Design Process • Training vs.
Education
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 1: Introduction to the Instructional
Design Process. Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching
as a Design Science: Building Pedagogical
Patterns for Learning and Technology (1st ed.).
Routledge, NY: Routledge. Chapter 1: Teaching as
a design science
2 • Course Development Teams; Structures
& Roles
• Course Development Teams; Structures
& Roles
• Course Development Teams; Structures
& Roles
Course Development Teams; Structures &
Roles Instructional Design Tools Backward
Method to Instructional Design
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 1: Introduction to the Instructional
Design Process. Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching
as a Design Science: Building Pedagogical
Patterns for Learning and Technology (1st ed.).
Routledge, NY: Routledge. Chapter 1: Teaching as
a design science
3 Instructional Design different generations &
their connection to learning theory: – First
generation instructional design (ID1) is
grounded in Behaviorism – Second
generation instructional design (ID2) is
grounded in Cognitivism – Third generation
instructional design (ID3) is grounded in
ConstructivismThe ADDIE Model – Gagne
Events – Kolb’s Model
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 14: Learning Theory and
Instructional Theory
4 Learn the Rules: Instructional Design
Project Management: Consideration &
Activities – Plan the work (project planning
& setting its stage) – Work the plan
(executing the project activities from start to
finish) – Break the Rules: Rapid
Development/ Rapid Prototyping
methodologies
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 16: Instructional Design Project
Management.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 7 of 10 Version 7
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
5 Instructional Design Project Front-End
Analysis (FEA): – Contextual Analysis –
Cultural contextualization of instruction –
Localization of instruction –
Culturally-inclusive/ responsive
instructional design
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 3: Learner and Contextual
Analysis. Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching as a
Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for
Learning and Technology (1st ed.). Routledge, NY:
Routledge. Chapter 3: What students bring to
learning
6 Instructional Design Project Front-End
Analysis (FEA): (Continued) – Needs
Analysis – Performance Analysis – Goal
Analysis
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 2: Identifying the Need for
Instruction
7 Instructional Design Project Front-End
Analysis (FEA): (Continued) – Learner
Analysis – The ARCS model of motivation
design – Learners attitudes, motivation &
engagement
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M. & Kemp, J. E. (2010).
Designing Effective Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken,
NJ: John Wiley & Sons. Chapter 3: Learner and
Contextual Analysis.
8 Instructional Unit Design: – Outcome-based
instruction – Learning outcomes: Goals
(general) & – Objectives (specific) –
Instructional objectives: – Functions of
objectives – Domains of objectives –
Writing objectives – Mager-style
instructional objectives – Bloom’s
Taxonomies
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M. & Kemp, J. E. (2010).
Designing Effective Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken,
NJ: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN- 978-047052282
Chapter 5: Instructional Objectives.
9 Designing Instruction: Content Structuring –
Decisions 1: Segmenting and Sequencing
Content – Structuring (Course Level) –
Decisions 2: Design Patterns for Fact
Learning, Concept Learning, Principles
Learning (Unit/Module Level) – Elaboration
Theory – Posner and Strike Theory –
Concept Mapping
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. (2010). Designing Effective Instruction
(6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
Chapter 6: Designing the Instruction: Sequencing.
10 Instructional Message Design: Presenting
content to learners – Pre-instructional
strategies: Pretests, Objectives,
Overviews, Advance organizers – Content
signaling through words and typography –
Pictures use to enhance learners’
understanding – Instructional Units Framing
Questions – Essential questions – Unit
questions – Content questions
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 8: Designing the Instructional
Message.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 8 of 10 Version 7
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
11 Major principles relating to designing and
conducting evaluations: – Validity &
reliability considerations in assessments –
Norm-referenced & criterion-referenced
assessments – Diagnostic assessments
(pre-tests), formative assessments &
summative assessments – Designing
assessment instruments: – Linking
assessments to pre-determined learning
objectives – Assessing knowledge –
Assessing skills – Assessing attitudes
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 11: The Many Faces of Evaluation.
Chapter 12: Developing Evaluation Instruments
12 Cognitive Psychology: – Cognitive load
theory: – Intrinsic cognitive load –
Extraneous cognitive load
Primacy-Recency Effect – Instructional
Formats: – Three instructional formats: –
Presentation to groupsSelf-paced learning –
Small-group interactive activities – The
Flipped Classroom – Instructional
Strategies: Initial presentation & generative
strategy
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 9: Developing Instructional
Materials. Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching as a
Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for
Learning and Technology (1st ed.). Routledge, NY:
Routledge. Chapter 5: What it takes to teach
13 Technology in Instructional Design: –
Technology use in planning instruction –
Technology use in delivering instruction –
Integrating technology in learning activities
design
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 10: Design Considerations for
Technology-Based Instruction.
14 Instructional design at the course level &
program level – Alignment: – Intra-alignment
– Inter-alignmentArticulation: – Vertical
Articulation (across same subject area) –
Horizontal Articulation (across same grade
level) – ID project management: quality
assurance – Standardization – Evaluation: –
Formative – Summative – Confirmative
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 13: Using Evaluation to Enhance
Programs: Conducting Formative and Summative
Evaluations. Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching as a
Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for
Learning and Technology (1st ed.). Routledge, NY:
Routledge. Chapter 12: Teaching as Developing
Pedagogical Patterns
15 Instructional Design at the course level &
program level – Alignment – Articulation: –
Vertical Articulation (across same subject
area) – Horizontal Articulation (across same
grade level) – Instructional Design project
management: quality assurance –
Standardization – Evaluation. – Formative –
Summative – Confirmative – Instructional
Design Change Management: – CLER
model – The Concerns-Based Adoption
Model (CBAM)
Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E. &
Kalman, H. K. (2010). Designing Effective
Instruction (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &
Sons. Chapter 13: Using Evaluation to Enhance
Programs: Conducting Formative and Summative
Evaluations. Chapter 15: Planning for Instructional
Implementation.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 9 of 10 Version 7
CISD610-Principles of Instructional Design
*Fulltime Faculty members and associates are expected to complete the 45 contact hours (teaching and learning hours) within 15
weeks. The end of course submissions, presentations, examinations and other types of final assessment will be scheduled during
the final assessment period. Please refer to the detailed schedule of the course and final assessment published in the course
schedule.
Postgraduate Course Syllabus Page 10 of 10 Version 7

 

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